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Bobby Fischer hbo

#1 User is offline   mike777 

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Posted 2011-June-06, 21:55

Watching the hbo Bobby Fischer show:

1) I dont know chess well enough to comment on that part
2) Amazing how everyone I mean everyone wanted Bobby to play =but did not want to pay him. Bobby held out as long as he could.
3) It seemed as if the whole world wanted him to play yet no one wanted to pay him his true value. They expected him to play for almost free for their amusement.

They then got mad when he held out for as long as he could.
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On the show it shows how everyone I mean everyone wanted BObby to play for their own selfish reasons...they never show any care about Bobby.
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#2 User is offline   Antrax 

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Posted 2011-June-06, 22:07

HBO managed to make Bobby Fischer look like a good guy? Now this I have to see.
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#3 User is offline   mike777 

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Posted 2011-June-06, 22:31

iN the second part what really stuck with me was:

1) ?Bobby basically deadly brain cancer
2) He needs to play more chess to get better......
3) Bobby has deadly brain issues.
4) He needs to act more sane to get better./

--

Bobby dies as a young man....64

I kept waiting for his close friends or those who hated him to say:


Bobby is almost brain dead he needs medical help now!
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#4 User is offline   Lobowolf 

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Posted 2011-June-07, 02:01

One of the more amazing things about Fischer (perhaps more amazing than some of his prime performances) is that he was apparently still about a top-30 player 20 years after his initial retirement. We only have one match to go by, but in the '92 match against Spassky, Fischer's 17.5/30 win would put him right around #30 or so. Spassky was an active, well above-average grandmaster, right around #100. Going +5 against him over 30 games, when he hadn't played a tournament game in 20 years and Spassky had remained active, was truly remarkable.
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#5 User is offline   kenberg 

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Posted 2011-June-07, 08:24

I saw parts of the show last night. I had a long day and then some wine, so I sort of nodded off from time to time But I think I got the thrust of it.

My take:

Fischer was a brilliant player (no one disagrees)
Fischer was a very difficult person (few disagree)
Fischer would probably be classified as a something or other by the psychiatric community.

Now about money:
Not many people want to pay a lot of money to sponsor chess. In things such as this I am pretty much a free market sort of guy. Fischer is not obligated to play, society is not obligated to pay what he asks.

Brilliance and psychosis:
One of the people on the film said that probably Fischer's brilliance was partly from his odd (I am not a psychiatrist so I will just use odd) mental state. I rarely look at things that way. People come as a unit, so in a sense every part of them is connected to every other part, but I prefer not to push these connections. A Beautiful Mind was about the troubled and brilliant mathematician John Nash. The book was a good deal more accurate than the movie I understand. But of course no one makes a movie about a brilliant mathematician who has a happy easy going life. Same with chess, I imagine.

It seems to me that Fischer was brilliant and difficult, and had friends who tried to stand by him but in many cases they finally just couldn't anymore. Some in the film were pretty explicit about just that. This is too bad, it's too bad when this happens to anyone, but, myself, I don't draw many conclusions from this other than "too bad".
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#6 User is offline   jmcw 

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Posted 2011-June-07, 10:49

Fischer's win over Spassky at the height of the cold was was the top international news story of its time.

Fischer's chess brilliance few would dispute, however, later in life his incessant rantings on anti Americanism and anti Semitism had many wondering if he was sane.

Decide for yourself, RIP
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#7 User is offline   dicklont 

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Posted 2011-June-07, 11:57

About Bobby Fischer and money. This must be viewed in it's own time and circumstances.

In Fischer’s days the Russians were dominant in chess. Their grandmasters were State-amateurs and could afford to play for relatively little price money. Even more so, they had no personal incentive to make more money, extra's were taken by the Russian authorities.

In many sports professionalism was just begining. Fischer may have looked stubborn but in retrospect he asked not a lot. He paved the way for many after him.
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#8 User is offline   cherdano 

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Posted 2011-June-07, 12:20

View Postjmcw, on 2011-June-07, 10:49, said:

Fischer's win over Spassky at the height of the cold was was the top international news story of its time.

Fischer's chess brilliance few would dispute, however, later in life his incessant rantings on anti Americanism and anti Semitism had many wondering if he was sane.

I thought the doubts about his sanity had started earlier...
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#9 User is offline   Free 

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Posted 2011-June-10, 07:16

I'm not sure which show you watched, but there's a very nice one on youtube about Fischer.

All I can say is: look at his games, he was briliant. He'd always start normal but from the moment his opponent left a little tiny door open he'd swoop in and crush him completely. Only a player like Tal was able to have a good score against Fischer, partly because Fischer was young at that time and partly because Tal thought way outside the box. :D

Fischer was a perfect example of a waste of talent. He got to the top and then disappeared. People wanted to see him play (obviously), but didn't want to pay for it. He was stuburn so he wouldn't play if he didn't get enough money (which is his right imo). For some reason he started hating certain groups of people, thought everything was a conspiracy,... The contrast makes it a very sad story imo: simply the best chess player that ever lived with a huge amount of personal issues. Luckily he left us some of his games.
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#10 User is offline   Lobowolf 

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Posted 2011-June-10, 21:53

View PostFree, on 2011-June-10, 07:16, said:

Tal was able to have a good score against Fischer, partly because Fischer was young at that time and partly because Tal thought way outside the box. :D



Almost all due to the latter. Tal went 4-0 against Fischer in a single tournament in 1959, the year Fischer turned 16, and his first real foray into international competition, and when Tal was essentially at his peak (one year before he won the world championship). After the 1959 Candidates' tournament, Fischer was +2 =5 -0 against Tal. Larsen thought way outside the box, and was a top player for many years (peaked at #3, top 5 for a few years, and top 10 for several years), and Fischer was +10 =1 -2 against him (though, granted, many of those wins came in the '71 match when Larsen was desperately trying to climb out of a hole in match play situation, and taking many risky chances).

A very underrated player who had a plus score against Fischer without beating him up as a teenager was Geller, who also had a plus record against Botvinnik, Smyslov, and Petrosian.
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Call me Desdinova...Eternal Light

C. It's the nexus of the crisis and the origin of storms.

IV: ace 333: pot should be game, idk

e: "Maybe God remembered how cute you were as a carrot."
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#11 User is offline   JLOGIC 

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Posted 2011-June-11, 02:54

Just watched this, it was very good, though as a fischer fanboi I knew most of the stuff in it.
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#12 User is offline   whereagles 

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Posted 2011-June-22, 16:42

Fischer was really brilliant. The natural intuition he had for the game was extremely rare.

He probably was a very unhappy person though. Which is a shame, because you definitely don't have to be a wacko to be good ;)
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#13 User is offline   Lovera 

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Posted 2019-July-21, 06:22

View PostFree, on 2011-June-10, 07:16, said:

I'm not sure which show you watched, but there's a very nice one on youtube about Fischer.

All I can say is: look at his games, he was briliant. He'd always start normal but from the moment his opponent left a little tiny door open he'd swoop in and crush him completely. Only a player like Tal was able to have a good score against Fischer, partly because Fischer was young at that time and partly because Tal thought way outside the box. :D

Fischer was a perfect example of a waste of talent. He got to the top and then disappeared. People wanted to see him play (obviously), but didn't want to pay for it. He was stuburn so he wouldn't play if he didn't get enough money (which is his right imo). For some reason he started hating certain groups of people, thought everything was a conspiracy,... The contrast makes it a very sad story imo: simply the best chess player that ever lived with a huge amount of personal issues. Luckily he left us some of his games.


https://youtu.be/fR70G0BThrs
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